To report a case of child abuse, call the Abuse Hotline at 1 800 96ABUSE Learn More Facebook You Tube
Located at the Marilyn Kapner Levin Center for Children’s Advocacy and Child Abuse Prevention and the Allen R. Levin Family Advocacy and Education Wing

Tips for Parents

TALKING TO YOUR KIDS About Body Safety

Stewards of Children is a training program that teaches adults how to prevent, recognize, and react responsibly to child sexual abuse using the 5 Steps to Protecting Our ChildrenTM. Step 3 of the 5 Steps, “Talk About It,” teaches adults to have open, age-appropriate conversations with children about topics like body safety, sex, and boundaries. Take Stewards of Children for in-depth insight and training.

Body Safety Conversations

Below are tips to keep your children safe:

Ages and Stages

Creative Communication

Safer Sleep for Your Baby

Corporal Punishment

Corporal Punishment 2

Car Safety-Heatstroke

Water Safety

Safer Sleepovers 

Taming a Tantrum

Talking to Kids and Teens

Talking about Events in the News

Talking about Sensitive Issues

Internet Safety Tips

Safer Social Networking 

Digital Contract

Smart Phone Safety Tips

Livestreaming

Safer YouTube Usage

How to Choose Appropriate Consequences

Choosing appropriate consequences is an important part of shaping your kids’ behavior. But choosing consequences that are just right for each situation — without being too lax or too severe — is difficult, especially when you're parenting on your own. If you worry that the discipline strategies you're using right now aren't working, then it's time to rethink the consequences you've chosen to use.

Learn more

 

Dealing With Difficult Child Behavior? 6 Ways

to Keep Your Cool

When your 2-year-old throws a temper tantrum at the playground, are you ready to scream along with him? Some days, your kid's behavior can push you to your limit. But, it's important to keep your cool. Although it may seem like yelling will result in the child behavior you're looking for, it's actually counterproductive, says Emily McNeil, co-owner and clinical director of the Mariposa Center for Infant, Child, and Family Enrichment in Denver, Colo. "It's neurobiologically impossible for a child to be more regulated than his parent," says McNeil. So if you want your child to be calm, the first step is staying calm yourself.

Learn more

 

Developing Your Child's Self-Esteem

Sometimes it's easy to notice when kids seem to feel good about themselves — and when they don't. We often describe this idea of feeling good about ourselves as "self-esteem." 

Kids who have healthy self-esteem tend to:

  • feel valued and accepted
  • feel confident that they can do what's expected
  • feel proud of a job well done
  • think good things about themselves
  • feel prepared for everyday challenges

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Know Child Abuse

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